Monthly Archives: May 2013

They’ll never get old and gray

The New York Times has an article about work by researchers at Harvard Medical School, which concluded that immigrants are a net plus for the finances of Medicare – even though most of the immigrants in the current wave have … Continue reading

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Interventions

I’m aiming at a reasonably comprehensive list of documented attempts to narrow or close IQ gaps between different groups, including planned interventions and natural experiments. I’d include results – primarily adult IQ, if we have that information. This being modern … Continue reading

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Face Blindness

Us humans seem to have a specialized mental mechanism for identifying faces. It’s pretty easy to see that could have been favored by selection for a long, long time. In 2006, Ingo Kennerknecht and associates published a study indicating that … Continue reading

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The End of Science

John Horgan believes that research on race and IQ should be banned, and that having university IRBs veto such research would be a reasonable way of doing so. There are problems with this idea. Not just that freedom of enquiry … Continue reading

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Tibet

MBE has a couple of new articles on altitude adaptation in Tibetans. One talks about a particular mutation in EGLN1, a key gene in the response to hypoxia. The mutation, around 0.5% in most other populations, has soared to 70% … Continue reading

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Clark/Frost Domestication

Gregory Clark, an economist at UC Davis, posted an essay several years ago titled Genetically Capitalist? in which he proposed that the stable social environment and institutions of Medieval England selected for a new kind of human who was less … Continue reading

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Cicada Doom

There is a fungus, Massospora cicadina, that attacks periodical cicadas[often called 17-year or 13-year locusts]. First, diploid resting spores infect cicadas just before they emerge, turning most of the abdomen into haploid spores while leaving the head and thorax intact. … Continue reading

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