Category Archives: World War Two

Tar-Zan*

*(means white skin, like you didn’t know that) A mutant version of SLC24a5 is the biggest single cause of light skin color in Western Eurasia. It’s very widespread: The usual explanation is that light skin ( in Western Eurasia), caused … Continue reading

Posted in Genetics, World War Two | 62 Comments

Educating Ginny

We’ve home-schooled our kids through 8th grade. That has had its ups and downs. At one point, just after the twins were born, I decided to have a look at the history of World War Two, the greatest of all … Continue reading

Posted in Education, World War Two | 66 Comments

IJA

Everyone has heard of famous last stands, such as Thermopylae, the Alamo,  or the French Foreign Legion at Camerone.   They are memorable partly because they are rare – generally, soldiers surrender when all is lost, assuming that their enemies give … Continue reading

Posted in World War Two | 140 Comments

Wizard War

Partly because it has some interesting examples of thick and thin problems, but mostly because it’s so damn much fun, I’m going to talk about The Wizard War, by R. V. Jones. Reginald Jones (Ph.D. Oxford, 1934)was one of the … Continue reading

Posted in Book Reviews, World War Two | 13 Comments

Enigma

The Western Allies, in World War II,  ran the most successful intelligence effort in history.  They did well against the Japanese, frequently making partial decrypts of JN-25, the main fleet code, along with lots of useful traffic analysis, etc.   … Continue reading

Posted in World War Two | 61 Comments

Gauge Transformation

As a reader pointed out, you don’t need to to have a flypaper memory to be a physicist.  There you can go a long way with a few basic facts and a long chain of mathematical reasoning.  You can see … Continue reading

Posted in World War Two | 53 Comments

War in the East

The books generally say that biological warfare is ineffective, but then they would say that, wouldn’t they? There is reason to think it has worked, and it may have made a difference. Once upon a time,  it was spring 1942, … Continue reading

Posted in World War Two | 50 Comments