Author Archives: gcochran9

Let’s Get Small

I said earlier than it seemed likely that archaic hominid living in special environments, for a long time (sometimes more than a million years) inevitably developed high-quality adaptations to those environments, and since such alleles are easily transmitted, modern humans … Continue reading

Posted in Altitude adaptations, Bushmen, Denisovans, Mangani, Pygmies | 4 Comments

Cal Tech

The only time I wandered around Cal Tech, I noticed a corpse lying on the floor of an office.

Posted in Uncategorized | 34 Comments

Ashkenazi Ancestry revisited

Shai Carmi has his article out on Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry.  A few comments: First, looks like a good job, on the whole. Perhaps Carmi had special training… Second, about dates: they assume a mutation rate of 1.44 x 10-8 per … Continue reading

Posted in Ashkenazi Jews | 100 Comments

The Genghis-Khan effect

We know of several examples of a huge expansion of a paternal lineage, and several other cases seem likely to be the same thing.  It’s worth taking a close look at the first one found, the paternal lineage of Genghis … Continue reading

Posted in Genghis -Khan effect, Neanderthals | 115 Comments

Understanding EDAR

The east Asian EDAR mutation is screwy: it does too many things. It causes increased scalp hair thickness, shovel-shaped incisors, an increase in the number of eccrine sweat glands, and smaller breasts. Which of these seem likely to confer a … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 106 Comments

We Three Kings

A recent article says that 40% of Chinese Y-chromosomes originated from 3 men in the late neolithic.  This pattern,  fantastic success for a particular paternal lineage, has been seen before, with the Golden Family (descendants of Genghis Khan) and the … Continue reading

Posted in Genetics | 52 Comments

Degüello

There’s a new paper out on the genetic prehistory of the Canadian Arctic. Basically, it says that existing Eskimos replaced a genetically different population less than 700 years ago, and that those earlier Paleo-Eskimos (Dorset culture) represent yet another separate … Continue reading

Posted in Amerindians, Eskimo | 69 Comments